‘The Watch will benefit downtown.’

Cam Yoos (29 Apr 2019) ‘The Watch will benefit downtown.’ The training covered many areas to provide The Watch volunteers with skills to interact with citizens on the streets of Lethbridge. The topics included dealing with persons with mental-health challenges, Indigenous awareness, the resources available through the City of Lethbridge, suicide awareness and dealing with persons with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD). Lethbridge Herald

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Exploring the contributions and suitability of relational and community‐centered fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) prevention work in First Nation communities

Jacqueline Pei, Elizabeth Carlson, Melissa Tremblay & Cheryl Poth (20 Feb 2019) ‘Exploring the contributions and suitability of relational and community‐centered fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) prevention work in First Nation communities.’ Conclusion: Relational, trauma‐informed, and community‐centered FASD prevention programming was perceived to have positive impacts and be well suited for use within Indigenous communities and allow for service delivery to be locally and culturally responsive

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Community-led solutions vital in addressing youth suicide

Liotta M (Feb 9 2019) ‘Community-led solutions vital in addressing youth suicide.’ News GP RACGP

In the interview, Ken Wyatt stated: ‘This report must not join the other reports into Aboriginal wellbeing delivered over the last 15 years that simply sit and gather dust – this report must lead a paradigm shift that leads to community-led solutions that address the clear sense of suffering, hopelessness and disillusionment that is being felt,’ he said.

Opinion: As per the recommendations, it is critical that screening infants and children for fetal alcohol be inclusive of screening for the parents. We must consider the intergenerational impact of alcohol and ask the question of parents: Did your parents drink when you were a child?

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Tuesday Tips: Dating and Sex

All persons are sexual beings and this doesn’t change just because someone has a FASD diagnosis. Individuals living with FASD have the right to express sexuality and affection and to all the information about sexuality he/she can understand. They will experience all the normal hormonal surges as any other developing young person, however, their social development and understanding may not match their biology. Therefore it is important that we, whether caregivers, professionals, friends or family, are having open and honest conversations or we may be increasing their risk of engaging in inappropriate sexual behaviors and/or becoming, victims or perpetrators (or both). Some suggestions for how to prepare and have these conversations and what they should include are included.  From Edmonton and area Fetal Alcohol Network Society 

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All families need support

FASD impacts the whole family. Living with this disability means families face greater challenges. Families across all ethnicities whether they’re adoptive, foster or biological families, need our support and understanding as they continue their journey with FASD. For more information, check out the website here… FASD Network of Saskatchewan

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